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Deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19)


There were 781 deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19) registered in the latest week (week ending 3 September 2021), accounting for 7.6% of all deaths in the UK. This is an increase from 769 deaths in the week before. The latest week included the Summer Bank Holiday, so differences between this week and the previous week should be treated with caution.

Deaths involving COVID-19 are consistently lower for people who have received two vaccinations. Between 2 January and 2 July 2021, there were 640 deaths involving COVID-19 in people who had received both vaccine doses (England), accounting for 1.2% of all deaths involving COVID-19 in that period (51,281 deaths).

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Deaths by vaccination status

Deaths involving COVID-19 are consistently lower for people who have received two vaccinations

Weekly age-standardised mortality rates for deaths involving COVID-19 by vaccination status, England, deaths occurring between Week 1 (week ending 8 January 2021) and Week 26 (week ending 2 July 2021)

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There were 640 deaths involving COVID-19 in people who had received both vaccine doses (England, 2 January to 2 July 2021). This accounts for 1.2% of all deaths involving COVID-19 in that period (51,281 deaths). In people who received their second dose at least 21 days before date of death, deaths involving COVID-19 accounted for 0.8% of all deaths. This compares with 37.4% of all deaths in unvaccinated individuals. Some deaths are expected in vaccinated individuals as the number of people who are vaccinated is high and no vaccine is 100% effective.

Weekly age-standardised mortality rates (ASMRs) for deaths involving COVID-19 are lower for people who received two vaccine doses than those who received one dose or were unvaccinated. ASMRs account for differences in population size and age of the vaccination status groups over time.

Last updated: 13/09/2021 

Read more about this in Deaths involving COVID-19 by vaccination status, England: deaths occurring between 2 January and 2 July 2021 

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Over 6 in 10 deaths involving COVID-19 in fully vaccinated people occurred in males

  • A "breakthrough death" involves COVID-19 and occurred in someone who had received both vaccine doses and had a first positive PCR test at least 14 days after the second vaccine dose 

  • There were 256 breakthrough deaths between 2 January and 2 July 2021 (England) 

  • A greater proportion of breakthrough deaths (61.1%) occurred in males, compared with other COVID-19 deaths (52.2%) 

  • A greater proportion of breakthrough deaths occurred in people who were identified as likely to be immunocompromised (13.1%), compared with other COVID-19 deaths (5.4%) 

  • These numbers should be interpreted with caution as the characteristics of breakthrough deaths can reflect the characteristics of the population more likely to be double vaccinated as well as increased risk of a breakthrough death, and numbers are relatively low

Last updated: 13/09/2021 

Read more about this in Deaths involving COVID-19 by vaccination status, England: deaths occurring between 2 January and 2 July 2021 

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Deaths

There were 781 deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19) registered in the UK in the week ending 3 September 2021. Of these, 632 were registered in England, 25 in Wales, 58 in Scotland, and 64 in Northern Ireland. Figures for England and Wales separately exclude deaths of non-residents, therefore the sum may differ from the total UK figure.

Weekly death registrations for Scotland and Northern Ireland are produced and published by National Records of Scotland and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency.

Last updated: 14/09/2021

Read more about this in Deaths registered weekly in England and Wales, provisional

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Mortality rates due to COVID-19 in England in July 2021 increased significantly from the previous month. The number of deaths due to COVID-19 in Wales for June 2021 was too small to create a reliable estimate. As a result, the mortality rate was not calculated, and so it is not possible to form a reliable comparison.

In July 2021, COVID-19 was the ninth most common cause of death in England and 22nd most common cause in Wales. Between November 2020 and February 2021 COVID-19 was the leading cause of death in both England and Wales.

Last updated: 23/08/2021

Read more about this in Monthly mortality analysis, England and Wales

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Deaths from all causes were above the five-year average

Number of deaths registered by week, England and Wales, 28 December 2019 to 3 September 2021

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The number of deaths from all causes was 6.7% above the five-year average in the latest week (week ending 3 September 2021). However, comparisons to the five-year average should be treated with caution in the latest week (week 35), as the Summer Bank Holiday has fallen in both week 35 and week 36 since 2015.

The total number of deaths registered between the weeks ending 13 March 2020 and 3 September 2021 in England and Wales was 891,028. Of these, 145,066 mentioned COVID-19 on the death certificate (16.3%).

Last updated: 14/09/2021

Read more about this in Deaths registered weekly in England and Wales, provisional

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Deaths by age

Positivity rates were highest in secondary school children, but hospital admissions and deaths were highest among older people

Estimated percentage of the population testing positive for COVID-19 in the week ending 11 September 2021, hospital admission rates in the week ending 12 September, and deaths registered in the week ending 3 September, by age, England

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Positivity rates were highest among secondary school children (school Years 7 to 11) in the latest week (week ending 11 September 2021). The positivity rate was lowest in adults aged 70 years and over. Hospital admission rates increased in groups aged 75 years and over but decreased or remained similar in all other age groups (week ending 12 September). Rates remained highest in groups aged 75 years and over and lowest in those aged 5 to 14 years.

The number of deaths involving COVID-19 decreased or remained similar in most age groups (week ending 3 September, England). However, the latest week included the Summer Bank Holiday, so differences in deaths between this week and the previous week should be treated with caution. The number of deaths involving COVID-19 was highest in those aged 85 years and over and lowest in children aged under 15 years.

Infection rates are from the Coronavirus Infection Survey, hospital admission rates from Public Health England national flu and COVID-19 surveillance reports, and number of deaths from Deaths registered weekly in England and Wales, provisional.

Last updated: 17/09/2021

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Pre-existing health conditions

Diabetes was the most common pre-existing condition among COVID-19 deaths in England and Wales between April and June 2021

Proportion of death certificates where the death was due to COVID-19 that had a top 20 (by frequency) pre-existing condition, England and Wales, registered between April and June 2021

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Of deaths in England and Wales where COVID-19 was the underlying cause, the most common pre-existing condition recorded on the death certificate was diabetes (April to June 2021). This was identified in almost a quarter (23%) of COVID-19 deaths.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dropped from second most common pre-existing condition (January to March 2021) to joint seventh most common pre-existing condition. This was accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of COVID-19 deaths that were of individuals aged 65 years and over. However, even for people aged 65 years and over, the proportion of COVID-19 deaths with dementia and Alzheimer’s as a pre-existing condition decreased.

Pre-existing health conditions are recorded if they are believed to have made some contribution to the death. Deaths may be counted more than once as someone may have more than one pre-existing condition. Health conditions may not be included if they were not considered relevant.

Last updated: 23/08/2021 

Read more about this in Monthly mortality analysis, England and Wales

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Deaths by region

How excess deaths have changed each month where you live

Deaths registered by MSOA each month, March 2020 to April 2021, compared with the average for the same month between 2015 and 2019, England and Wales

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Use your postcode to see the number of excess deaths each month in your neighbourhood.

There are 7,201 neighbourhoods (officially known as Middle-layer Super Output Areas or MSOAs) in England and Wales with an average population of around 8,000. Some neighbourhoods saw more than twice as many residents die than would have been expected for the time of year during the spring and summer of 2020, while excess deaths were spread out over a longer period in the following autumn and winter.

Deaths between March 2020 and April 2021 are compared with the average for the same month between 2015 and 2019.

Last updated: 03/08/2021

Read more about this in Excess deaths in your neighbourhood during the coronavirus (COVID-19)

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Deaths by sex

COVID-19 mortality rates were higher for men than women

Age-standardised and age-specific mortality rates for deaths due to COVID-19 by sex and age group, per 100,000 people, England and Wales, 2020

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Mortality rates due to COVID-19 were significantly higher for men than women across all age groups. Men accounted for over a half (55.6%) of COVID-19 deaths in 2020. 

Mortality rates increased with age group, from 15.9 deaths per 100,000 people under 65 years to 2,918.1 deaths per 100,000 people aged 90 years and over. 

Last updated: 06/07/2021 

Read more about this in Deaths due to COVID-19, registered in England and Wales: 2020

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Deaths by ethnicity

Most ethnic minority groups had higher risk of death involving COVID-19 than those of White British background

  • Patterns of coronavirus (COVID-19) mortality risk by ethnic group changed over the course of the pandemic.

  • In the first wave of the pandemic (24 January to 11 September 2020), people of Black and South Asian ethnic background had substantially higher risk of death involving COVID-19, compared with those of White British background. 

  • In the second wave of the pandemic (12 September 2020 onwards), people of Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic background were particularly at risk; while people of Black ethnic background remained at higher risk in the second wave, the relative risk compared with White British people was reduced. 

Last updated: 26/05/2021 

Read more about this in Updating ethnic contrasts in deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19), England: 24 January 2020 to 31 March 2021

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Further information


This page provides an overview of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in the UK, bringing together data from multiple sources. Each graphic provides a link to explore the topic further. See the more information page to read about different data sources used in the tool.

The tool is updated regularly when relevant data are published. This is typically at least twice a week, for example:

  • when weekly deaths registrations are published (usually on a Tuesday)

  • when results from the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, and Opinions and Lifestyle Survey are published (usually on a Friday)

Daily updates on COVID-19 levels and vaccinations can be found on GOV.UK.

Some policy areas are devolved and more information is available for Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

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Contact

Latest insights team
infection.survey.analysis@ons.gov.uk