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Infections and deaths

The percentage of people testing positive in England remains high, but decreased slightly

22 January 2021

An estimated 1 in 55 people tested positive for the coronavirus (COVID-19) within the community population in England, during the week ending 16 January 2021, equating to 1,023,700 people, or 1.88% of the population.

This is a decrease from the week ending 2 January 2021 when 1,122,000 people (2.06%) were estimated to have COVID-19.

The percentage of people testing positive in Wales levelled off. An estimated 44,000 people, around 1 in 70 or 1.45% of the population, had the virus during the week ending 16 January 2021.

In Northern Ireland the percentage of people testing positive has increased over the previous two weeks. An estimated 29,400 people had COVID-19 in the week ending 16 January 2021, equating to 1 in 60 people or 1.60% of the population.

In Scotland, the percentage of people testing positive levelled off in the week ending 16 January 2021 at around 1 in 100 people, equating to an estimated 52,200 people or 0.99% of the population.

As there was no publication of the infection survey on 15 January 2021, there are no official estimates for the week ending 9 January 2021.

New variant

In England, the percentage of people with new variant compatible positives has decreased in London, the South East and East of England in the week ending 16 January 2021, while in other regions increases have generally levelled off.

In the week ending 16 January 2021, the percentage of people testing positive and compatible with the new variant decreased in London, the South East and East of England

Modelled percentage of cases that are compatible with the new variant (ORF1ab- and N-gene positive) and other variants based on nose and throat swabs, daily, by region since 6 December 2020, England

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Notes:
  1. New variant compatible positives are defined as those that are positive on the N-gene and ORF1ab-gene, but not the S-gene, regardless of cycle threshold (Ct) value.
  2. All results are provisional and subject to revision.
  3. These statistics refer to infections reported in the community, by which we mean private households. These figures exclude infections reported in hospitals, care homes and/or other institutional settings.
  4. Data should be treated with caution. There are small numbers of positives detected leading to considerable uncertainty surrounding these estimates. There are further uncertainties given that not all cases that are positive on the ORF1ab- and N-genes will be the new variant.
  5. For tests compatible with the new UK variant, this analysis uses weeks commencing Monday, and the most recent week this week is 11 to 17 January 2021. We use these time periods to align with other standard infectious disease surveillance as used by WHO in the main Ct monitoring report.

Data download

Analysis | Data

Percentage of deaths involving COVID-19 rises to highest of the pandemic

26 January 2021

There were 7,245 deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) in England and Wales in the week ending 15 January 2021 – an increase of 1,188 compared with the previous week.

Deaths involving COVID-19 accounted for 40.2% of the 18,042 deaths registered in the week ending 15 January, the highest proportion since the start of the pandemic.

The number of COVID-19 deaths increased in eight out of nine English regions, with only Yorkshire and the Humber seeing a fall compared with the previous week. Wales also reported a rise for the sixth consecutive week.

Record numbers of COVID-19 deaths in Wales, the East of England, and the South East of England

Number of deaths in Wales and regions in England, registered between 3 January 2020 and 15 January 2021

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Notes:
  1. Based on area of usual residence. Geographical boundaries are based on the most up-to-date information available at the time of publication.
  2. Figures exclude deaths of non-residents.
  3. Based on date a death was registered rather than occurred.
  4. All figures for 2020 and 2021 are provisional.
  5. The International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition (ICD-10) definitions are as follows; coronavirus (COVID-19) (U07.1 and U07.2).
  6. The number of deaths registered in 2020 (Weeks 19, 20, 22, 23, 36, 37, 52 and 53) and in Week 1 2021 were affected by Bank Holidays.
  7. The Week 52 five-year average is used to compare against Week 53 deaths.
  8. The five-year average has been provided for 2015 to 2019 (rather than 2016 to 2020) because of the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on deaths registered in 2020. The average for 2015 to 2019 provides a comparison of the number of deaths expected per week in a usual (non-pandemic) year.

Data download

In total, there have been 94,971 deaths involving COVID-19 registered in England and Wales since the start of the pandemic (up to 15 January 2021). Around 75% of these have occurred among people aged 75 years and over.

Our data are based on deaths registered in England and Wales and include all deaths where “COVID-19” was mentioned on the death certificates. Weekly figures are available by local authority and health board.

Analysis | Data

People testing positive for new UK variant of COVID-19 are more likely to report symptoms

27 January 2021

People testing positive for the new UK variant of the coronavirus (COVID-19) have been more likely to report some symptoms than those whose tests were not compatible with the new variant, but were less likely to report loss of taste or smell. There was no evidence of difference in the percentages reporting gastrointestinal symptoms.

This is according to a survey of people who tested positive for COVID-19 in England between 15 November 2020 and 16 January 2021. More information about the new UK variant of COVID-19 is available in our Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, UK: 22 January 2021.

Individuals taking part in the survey were asked whether they had experienced a range of possible symptoms in the seven days before they were tested, and separately whether they felt that they had symptoms compatible with COVID-19 infection in the last seven days.

We have categorised reported symptoms as follows:

  • any: all reported symptoms, including general reporting of symptoms compatible with COVID-19 (not naming specific symptoms)
  • classic: cough, fever, shortness of breath, loss of taste or loss of smell
  • gastrointestinal (GI): abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea
  • loss of taste or smell only

People testing positive compatible with the new UK variant were more likely to report any symptoms and the classic symptoms

Percentage of people with symptoms by variant, including only those who have strong positive cycle threshold tests (Ct < 30), from 15 November 2020 to 16 January 2021, in England

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Notes:
  1. These results are provisional and subject to revision.
  2. These statistics refer to infections reported in the community, by which we mean private households. These figures exclude infections reported in hospitals, care homes or other institutional settings.
  3. Symptoms are self-reported and were not professionally diagnosed
  4. This analysis covers the time period between 15 November 2020 to 16 January 2021.
  5. The strength of the test is determined by how quickly the virus is detected, measured by a cycle threshold (Ct) value. The lower the Ct value, the higher the viral load and stronger the positive test. There is more information on Ct values in a paper written by academic partners at the University of Oxford.

Download the data

Meanwhile, the analysis published today shows that the percentage of people testing positive for COVID-19 has decreased in non-patient facing job roles in England. However, the positivity rate has increased among those in a patient-facing role (such as frontline health workers).

With schools closing as part of new lockdown restrictions, the number of socially distanced and physical contacts that adults and school age children had with people outside their household decreased in January.

Analysis|Data

Coronavirus was the leading cause of death in England and Wales in December

18 January 2021

The coronavirus (COVID-19) was the leading cause of death in December 2020 in both England and in Wales.

Of the 52,676 deaths registered in December 2020 in England, 20.8% (10,973 deaths) were due to COVID-19. This means the coronavirus was identified as the underlying cause of death. This is the highest proportion seen in England since May 2020 (when 23.1% of all deaths were due to COVID-19).

In Wales, 27.4% of the 3,941 deaths registered in December 2020 were due to COVID-19 (1,081 deaths), the highest proportion since April 2020 (when 30.1% of all deaths were due to COVID-19).

Based on provisional data for January to December 2020, COVID-19 was the leading cause of death in England and Wales during the whole of 2020.

The following interactive map allows you to see the cumulative number of monthly deaths due to COVID-19 in each area in England and Wales. The map uses Middle layer Super Output Areas, which are areas that each have a similarly sized population and remain stable over time.

Number of deaths due to COVID-19 in Middle layer Super Output Areas, England and Wales, deaths registered between 1 March and 31 December 2020

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Notes:
  1. Points on the map are placed at the centre of the local area they represent and do not show the actual location of deaths. The size of the circle is proportional to the number of deaths.
  2. To protect confidentiality, a small number of deaths have been reallocated between neighbouring areas. Given the method used for this, figures for some areas may be different to previously published data.
  3. Figures are for deaths registered rather than deaths occurring in each month.
  4. Figures exclude deaths of non-residents; geographical boundaries are based on the most up-to-date information available at the time of publication.
  5. Deaths “due to COVID-19” include only deaths where COVID-19 was the underlying cause of death.
  6. Locally adopted Middle layer Super Output Area (MSOA) names are provided by House of Commons Library. While these names are not officially supported for National Statistics, they are provided here to help local users.
  7. Figures are provisional.

Further analysis of death registrations data for England and Wales, including breakdowns by sex and age, are presented in Monthly mortality analysis, England and Wales: December 2020.

Analysis | Data

Highest rates of death in men who work in elementary occupations

22 January 2021

Men working in elementary occupation groups, such as security or caring, leisure and other service occupations, had the highest rates of death involving COVID-19.

Analysis of coronavirus-related deaths by occupation in England and Wales, registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020, show they experienced 66.3 and 64.1 deaths per 100,000 males, respectively.

Four other major occupation groups had statistically significantly higher rates of death in men involving COVID-19 when compared to the rate of COVID-19 among men of the same age in the population.

These were process, plant and machine operatives (52.8 deaths per 100,000 males); skilled trades occupations (40.4 deaths per 100,000 males; sales and customer service occupations (40.3 deaths per 100,000 males), and administrative and secretarial occupations (39.0 deaths per 100,000 males).

The analysis concerns those of working age between 20 and 64 years, and deaths involving COVID-19 includes those where COVID-19 was the underlying cause of death or a factor that contributed to the death.

Men working in elementary occupations or caring, leisure and other service occupations had the highest rates of death involving COVID-19

Age-standardised mortality rates of death involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) in England and Wales, by major occupational group, deaths registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020

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Notes:
  1. Deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) include those with an underlying cause, or any mention, of U07.1 (COVID-19, virus identified) or U07.2 (COVID-19, virus not identified).
  2. Figures are for residents of England and Wales aged 20 to 64 years.
  3. Occupations defined using the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC 2010).
  4. Figures are for the most recent death registrations available at the time of analysis: deaths involving COVID-19 registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020.
  5. Age-standardised rates are only presented for occupations with 20 or more deaths.

Data download

For women, the significantly higher rates of death involving COVID-19 were among broad occupation groups including process, plant and machine operatives (33.7 deaths per 100,000 females), caring, leisure and other service occupations (27.3 deaths per 100,000 females), followed by 21.1 deaths per 100,000 females in elementary occupations.

Women working in Process, plant and machine operatives, and Caring, leisure and other service occupations had the highest rate of death involving COVID-19 compared with women of the same age in the general population

Age-standardised mortality rates of death involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) in England and Wales, deaths registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020

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Notes:
  1. Deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) include those with an underlying cause, or any mention, of U07.1 (COVID-19, virus identified) or U07.2 (COVID-19, virus not identified).
  2. Figures are for residents of England and Wales aged 20 to 64 years.
  3. Occupations defined using the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC 2010).
  4. Figures are for the most recent death registrations available at the time of analysis: deaths involving COVID-19 registered between 9 March and 28 December 2020.
  5. Age-standardised rates are only presented for occupations with 20 or more deaths.

Data download

The analysis does not prove conclusively that the observed rates of death involving COVID-19 are necessarily caused by differences in occupational exposure; rates are adjusted for age, but not other factors such as ethnic group, place of residence, and the occupations of others in the household.

Notes:

• Occupation was defined using the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC 2010). • The analysis is based on provisional data, and findings could change as more deaths are registered. In particular, there may be deaths in some occupations that have not yet been registered because a coroner's inquest is required. • Men had a statistically higher rate of death involving COVID-19, with 31.4 deaths per 100,000 men of the working population, compared with 16.8 deaths per 100,000 women.

Analysis

COVID-19 cases and hospital admissions fell in London, South East and East of England, but remained high

22 January 2021

Hospital admissions and COVID-19 infections remained high, but fell in London, the South East and East of England in the week ending 17 January. Cases compatible with the new COVID-19 variant also decreased in these regions, which had seen high levels in recent weeks.

Despite these decreases in the latest week, London still has the highest positivity rate among English regions at 2.89%, and the second highest hospital admission rate at 44.5 per 100,000 people.

The North East recorded the second highest positivity rate, and saw the largest increase in hospital admissions, rising to 36.3 admissions per 100,000 people from 25.8 in the week ending 10 January.

Deaths involving COVID-19 increased in the week ending 8 January in all English regions, with the largest increase and highest number of deaths seen in the South East.

Hospital admissions and deaths involving COVID-19 by region 

Change in hospital admission rates and numbers of deaths involving COVID-19 from previous week, England, weeks ending 17 and 8  January 2021

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Notes:
  1. All figures are provisional and subject to revision. 
  2. Infection statistics refer to infections reported in the community, by which we mean residential households. These figures exclude infections reported in hospitals, care homes and/or other institutional settings. 
  3. Figures exclude deaths of non-residents. 
  4. Based on date a death was registered rather than occurred. 
  5. The International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10) definitions are as follows: coronavirus (COVID-19) (U07.1 and U07.2). 
  6. We use the term “involving COVID-19” when referring to deaths that had COVID-19 mentioned anywhere on the death certificate, whether as an underlying cause or not.

Data download

Analysis

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Economy, business and jobs

The economy fell by 2.6% in November 2020 as government restrictions reduced economic activity

15 January 2021

Following six consecutive monthly increases, including an upwardly revised 0.6% increase in October, monthly gross domestic product (GDP) fell by 2.6% in November 2020.

Restrictions were in place to varying degrees across all four nations of the UK during November. Restriction announcements for each nation are available:

November GDP fell back to 8.5% below the levels seen in February 2020 compared with 6.1% below in October 2020.

The services sector acted as the main drag on growth in November, falling by 3.4% as restrictions on activity were reintroduced. The largest contributor to this fall was accommodation and food service activities, followed by wholesale and retail trade. The services sector is now 9.9% below the level of February 2020.

The production sector also fell marginally by 0.1% in November 2020, remaining 4.7% below its February 2020 level. Elsewhere the construction sector saw positive growth of 1.9% in November 2020, recovering to 0.6% above the February 2020 level.

Analysis | Data

There is a large increase in the unemployment rate, while the employment rate continues to fall

26 January 2021

Early estimates for December 2020 indicate that the number of payrolled employees fell by 2.7% compared with December 2019, which is a fall of 793,000 employees. Since February 2020, the number of payroll employees has fallen by 828,000; however, the larger falls were seen at the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Data from our Labour Force Survey shows a large increase in the unemployment rate while the employment rate continues to fall.

In the three months to November, there was a large increase in the unemployment rate while the employment rate continues to fall

UK employment, unemployment and economic inactivity rates, seasonally adjusted, between September to November 2005 and September to November 2020

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Source: Office for National Statistics – Labour Force Survey

The number of people reporting redundancy in the three months prior to interview increased in September to November 2020 by a record 280,000 on the year to reach a record high of 395,000.

Although decreasing over the year, total hours worked increased from the low levels in the previous quarter, even with the September to November period covering a time when a number of coronavirus (COVID-19) lockdown measures were reintroduced.

The number of people temporarily away from work has fallen since its peak in April and May 2020, although it has risen slightly in November. The number of people away from work because of the pandemic and receiving no pay has also fallen since the start of the pandemic but risen slightly over the last month.

The vacancies recovery has slowed in October to December 2020 and are still below the levels seen before the coronavirus pandemic.

Annual growth in average employee pay continued to strengthen, but this growth is increasingly being driven by compositional effects of a fall in the number and proportion of lower-paid employee jobs. Current average pay growth rates are being impacted upwards by a fall in the number and proportion of lower-paid jobs compared with before the Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic.

Analysis | Data

Retail sales rose in December, but saw a record decline in 2020 as a whole

22 January 2021

Retail sales increased slightly in December 2020 compared with November 2020, with the value of sales increasing 0.4% and the volume of sales (quantity bought) increasing 0.3%.

This reflects a period of eased coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions in early December, following a national lockdown in England in November.

Although tighter restrictions to non-essential retail were introduced later in December, feedback from retailers suggested that Christmas purchases through click and collect and online sales lessened the impact of these measures.

Total retail sales volumes fell 1.9% in 2020 compared with 2019. This is the largest annual drop since records began.

Clothing stores saw the largest annual fall in 2020 at negative 25.1%, followed by fuel retailers where sales dropped 22.2%. Retail and travel restrictions introduced to curb the spread of coronavirus in 2020 heavily affected these sectors.

However, food stores recorded their highest yearly growth since 2001, and non-store retailers (which include online stores) reported a record annual growth of 32%. The amount spent in online stores in 2020 increased 46.1% compared with 2019, the largest annual increase since 2008.

Analysis | Data

Highest December borrowing since records began in 1993

22 January 2021

The December 2020 public sector finance figures reflect the ongoing unprecedented impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) lockdown and the government’s support for individuals and businesses.

UK public sector borrowing in December 2020 was £34.1 billion, the highest December figure since monthly records began in 1993.

Borrowing makes up the shortfall between the spending of the government and other public sector organisations and their income, such as tax receipts.

In December 2020, central government bodies spent £86.2 billion on their day-to-day activities, £26.1 billion more than a year earlier. This increase was in part because of the additional £10.0 billion cost of the job furlough schemes.

Central government tax receipts were £43.6 billion in December 2020, £1.4 billion less than in December 2019, with falls in many taxes affected by the pandemic such as Value Added Tax (VAT) and Business Rates.

Between April and December 2020, the public sector has borrowed £270.8 billion, £212.7 billion more than in the same period a year ago. The independent Office for Budget Responsibility has estimated borrowing could reach £393.5 billion by the end of the financial year (March 2021).

The recent substantial increase in UK borrowing has led to a sharp increase in public sector net debt.

UK public sector net debt increased by £333.5 billion in the first nine months of the financial year and currently stands at £2.1 trillion or 99.4% of gross domestic product (GDP) – a level not seen since the early 1960s.

Analysis | Data

Coronavirus hits young and poorly-paid furloughed workers the hardest

21 January 2021

Young people and those on the lowest incomes who were furloughed are more likely to have felt the impact of the coronavirus.

Estimates of personal and economic well-being in Great Britain, from March 2020 to December 2020, showed people under 30 years and those with household incomes under £10,000 were around 40% and 60% respectively more likely to be furloughed than the general population.

Young people and those on the lowest incomes were as likely to be impacted in this second phase, during November, as they were in the first lockdown. There was a six-fold increase in those aged under 30 years reporting that they had been furloughed, from 2.1% for the four days to 1 November to 12.3% for the period 4 to 8 November.

Those on the lowest incomes were also more likely to be furloughed over 2020. During 11 to 15 November, when restrictions were tightened in some areas of the country, 17% of people with a household income less than £10,000 reported that they had been furloughed. This compares with 2.7% of people with a household income of more than £40,000 who said they had been furloughed.

Analysis

UK debit and credit card purchases 35% below their February 2020 average

21 January 2021

Today for the first time we are launching an experimental faster indicator for estimating UK spending using debit and credit cards.

In the week to 14 January 2021, aggregate Clearing House Automated Payment System (CHAPS) debit and credit card purchases were 35% below their February 2020 average, with delayable expenditure seeing further decline from the previous week to 49% below its February 2020 average.

CHAPS data from the Bank of England provide an indicator of UK companies’ transactions made by customers using both physical and online platforms. It includes data on debit and credit card purchases. CHAPS data represent a big step forward in seeing how short-term purchasing habits are changing.

The chart shows changes in the value of CHAPS payments received by large UK corporates from their credit and debit card processors “merchant acquirers” and shows that debit and credit card spending rose sharply over the festive period. CHAPS debit and credit card retail consumer purchases were on average 4% greater in December 2020 than in February 2020. This increase was driven by staples and delayable spending, such as in supermarkets and other retail stores, which typically increase in December.

Spending fell in the week following Christmas, and has remained relatively low for “work-related”, “social” and “delayable” expenditure. This coincided with the extension of Tier 4 restrictions in England on Boxing Day, and the start of national lockdowns in the UK on 5 January 2021.

Analysis

Business closures up 37% on 2019 in the final quarter of 2020

27 January 2021

Business closures in the last three months of 2020 were 37% higher than in the same period in 2019.

Figures for Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2020 show business creations were also 24% higher than 2019.

The Inter-Departmental Business Register (IDBR) gives an indication of how many companies have closed or started up, based on businesses added to or removed from the register.

All industries, except motor trades, had a higher number of business closures in Quarter 4 2020 than in Quarter 4 2019.

Of businesses removed from the register in Quarter 4 2020, a larger proportion than last year were in the information and communication industry, a pattern seen since Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2020.

By contrast, businesses in the accommodation and food services industry made up a smaller share of business closures in Quarter 4 2020 than usual. This may be because of measures taken by the government to support industries through the pandemic.

Sectors with the largest increases in new businesses this quarter, year-on-year, were business services, retail, professional and scientific industries, and transportation and storage.

Numbers of new businesses have fallen in other sectors such as health and social care, education, arts and entertainment, accommodation and food, and construction.

Analysis | Data

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People and social impacts

More people working from home but optimism falling

22 January 2021

Homeworking has reached its highest level since June 2020 and compliance with lockdown measures remains high.

Around 45% of respondents to the Opinion and Lifestyle Survey said they were working from home, while around 65% of people said they had stayed at home or only left their home for limited reasons, the highest proportion since May 2020.

The proportion of people who felt that it would take more than a year for life to return to normal is now 25%, slightly higher than those who feel life will return to normal in six months or less (22%).

This week, a quarter of adults reported they felt that it will take more than a year for life to return to normal

Great Britain, March 2020 to January 2021

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Notes:
  1. Question: "How long do you think it will be before your life returns to normal?".
  2. Base population for percentage: all adults.
  3. Totals may not sum to 100% due to rounding.

Scores for life satisfaction and feeling like life is worthwhile have remained around the lowest levels since the survey began in March 2020. Happiness also fell slightly this week to its lowest level since March 2020, although people were slightly less anxious.

Attitudes to vaccination appear to have gradually improved. Questions asked in the survey now include whether respondents have had or been offered a COVID-19 vaccine. Overall, around 9 in 10 (90%) of respondents had either had a vaccine, accepted the offer of one and awaiting vaccination, or said they were likely or very likely to accept one if offered.

Around 1 in 14 (7%) adults in Great Britain reported they had already received at least partial COVID-19 vaccination by this week. Around 1 in 20 (5%) said that they had been offered it and were awaiting it and 1 in 100 (1%) said that they had been offered it but declined it.

The survey figures are self-reported and do not include adults living in care homes or other establishments, so will not capture vaccinations in these settings. The latest official administrative data on the number of adults in Great Britain who have received COVID-19 vaccination is available.

Analysis | Data

Two-thirds of students report worse mental health since the start of the autumn term

27 January 2021

Nearly two-thirds (63%) of higher education students said their mental health and well-being had worsened since the start of the autumn 2020 term, according to experimental figures from the latest Student COVID-19 Insights Survey (SCIS).

This is an increase on the proportion of students who reported the same during the previous survey round, carried out in late November 2020 (57%).

Worsening mental health and well-being was more common among students whose living arrangements had changed since the start of the autumn term (73%) than among those whose living arrangements had stayed the same (62%).

The average life satisfaction score for all students was 4.8 (out of 10) in January 2021, which was significantly lower than the life satisfaction of the general population in Great Britain (6.4) in a similar period.

Students reported a lower level of life satisfaction than the general population in Great Britain in January 2021

Average ratings of life satisfaction, feeling that the things done in life are worthwhile, happiness and anxiety for students and the general population, English universities and Great Britain, January 2021

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Notes:
  1. Estimates for “all students” are calculated from the Student COVID-19 Insights Survey (SCIS) between 8 January 2021 and 18 January 2021, and represent students studying at English universities.
  2. Estimates for the “general population” are calculated from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (COVID-19 module) between 7 January 2021 and 10 January 2021, and represent the Great British population.
  3. Please note that these two surveys have different data collection methods, therefore should not be compared directly but can be considered in reference to each other.
  4. The error bars show 95% confidence intervals highlighting the degree of uncertainty around an estimate. Non-overlapping confidence intervals suggest a statistically significant difference between groups.
  5. Scores for life satisfaction and feeling like life is worthwhile have remained around the lowest levels since the survey began in March 2020. Happiness also fell slightly this week to its lowest level since March 2020, although people were slightly less anxious.

Further findings are presented in Coronavirus and higher education students: England, 8 January to 18 January 2021. Care should be taken when interpreting these statistics, as they are experimental.

Analysis | Data

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User requests

We continue to respond to data requests from the public, media and government during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Responses are published in our list of user requested data.

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